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National Bird Watching Day

Posted by The Piggyback Rider Team on

It’s a new year which means 365 days of new adventures to be had! The Piggyback rider can be used in so many different ways and makes trips with the little ones that much easier and loads more fun. Yesterday was National Bird Watching day and we thought it would be a great way to use the Piggyback Rider. It gives your toddler a “bird’s eye view” of the birds! We have so much amazing wildlife all over the United States. Take a look at a few of the cool birds in your area and take your Piggyback Rider out to look for them!





PACIFIC NORTHWEST

The house finch is an extremely common bird in the northwest states. They are light brown/grey color with red accents and baby birds can be seen anywhere from Feb. to August.




SOUTHWEST

Quail are a popular bird in the southwest region and can be seen walking around with a line of babies following in the spring months. Their single feather or “hat” on the top of their heads makes them easy to spot in desert.



MIDWEST

With all the lakes in the midwest, it is very common to see ducks. The blue-winged teal is a native duck to Minnesota and is beautiful to look at. They are fast-flying and sensitive to the cold, tending to migrate much early in the year than other ducks.







SOUTHEAST

Giving a popular NFL football team their name, falcons are often seen in the southeast along with many other predatory birds. Falcons fly extremely fast and prefer wide-open spaces close to coasts.








NORTHEAST

Although extremely common and not the most interesting bird, Ravens are huge in the Northeast. With their jet black feathers and long beaks these guys are hard to miss. Many people often mistake ravens for crows but a raven’s massive size is the distinction between these birds.






We hope that you can get outdoors and find some of these birds we’ve mentioned along with many more! Take your Piggyback Rider on unexpected adventures this year and share it with us!

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